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Electricity demand in Kazakhstan

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  • Atakhanova, Zauresh
  • Howie, Peter
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V2W-4N6NHMW-2/2/f600c725c58eefc2a3ab079d88cc725a
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 7 (July)
    Pages: 3729-3743

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:35:y:2007:i:7:p:3729-3743

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    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
    2. Gang Liu, 2004. "Estimating Energy Demand Elasticities for OECD Countries. A Dynamic Panel Data Approach," Discussion Papers 373, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
    3. Masayasu Ishguro & Takamasa Akiyama, 1995. "Electricity demand in Asia and the effects on energy supply and the investment environment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1557, The World Bank.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 1998. "Output Decline in Transition," IMF Working Papers 98/45, International Monetary Fund.
    5. von Hirschhausen, Christian & Andres, Michael, 2000. "Long-term electricity demand in China -- From quantitative to qualitative growth?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 231-241, April.
    6. Freund, Caroline & Wallich, Christine, 1997. "Public-Sector Price Reforms in Transition Economies: Who Gains? Who Loses? The Case of Household Energy Prices in Poland," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(1), pages 35-59, October.
    7. Blundell, R. & Bond, S., 1995. "Initial Conditions and Moment Restrictions in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Economics Papers 104, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    8. Nahata, Babu & Izyumov, Alexei & Busygin, Vladimir & Mishura, Anna, 2007. "Application of Ramsey model in transition economy: A Russian case study," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 105-125, January.
    9. Andrea Bigano & Francesco Bosello & Giuseppe Marano, 2006. "Energy Demand and Temperature: A Dynamic Panel Analysis," Working Papers 2006.112, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    10. Horn, Manfred, 1999. "Energy demand until 2010 in Ukraine," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(12), pages 713-726, November.
    11. Chang, Yoosoon & Martinez-Chombo, Eduardo, 2003. "Electricity Demand Analysis Using Cointegration and Error-Correction Models with Time Varying Parameters: The Mexican Case," Working Papers 2003-08, Rice University, Department of Economics.
    12. Hsiao, Cheng & Mountain, Dean C. & Chan, M. W. Luke & Tsui, Kai Y., 1989. "Modeling Ontario regional electricity system demand using a mixed fixed and random coefficients approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 565-587, December.
    13. Dodonov, Boris & Opitz, Petra & Pfaffenberger, Wolfgang, 2004. "How much do electricity tariff increases in Ukraine hurt the poor?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 855-863, May.
    14. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
    15. Desai, Dinesh, 1986. "Energy-GDP relationship and capital intensity in LDCs," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 113-117, April.
    16. Anderson, T. W. & Hsiao, Cheng, 1982. "Formulation and estimation of dynamic models using panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 47-82, January.
    17. Caballero, Ricardo J & Engel, Eduardo M R A, 1992. "Beyond the Partial-Adjustment Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 360-64, May.
    18. Anderson, Kathryn H. & Pomfret, Richard, 2002. "Relative Living Standards in New Market Economies: Evidence from Central Asian Household Surveys," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 683-708, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Inglesi, Roula, 2010. "Aggregate electricity demand in South Africa: Conditional forecasts to 2030," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 197-204, January.
    2. Lin, Boqiang & Zhang, Guoliang, 2013. "Estimates of electricity saving potential in Chinese nonferrous metals industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 558-568.
    3. Pourazarm, Elham & Cooray, Arusha, 2013. "Estimating and forecasting residential electricity demand in Iran," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 546-558.
    4. Lin, Boqiang & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2014. "Electricity demand and conservation potential in the Chinese nonmetallic mineral products industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 243-253.
    5. World Bank, 2011. "A New Slant on Slopes : Measuring the Benefits of Increased Electricity Access in Developing Countries," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2742, The World Bank.
    6. Inglesi-Lotz, R., 2011. "The evolution of price elasticity of electricity demand in South Africa: A Kalman filter application," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3690-3696, June.
    7. Rentizelas, Athanasios & Georgakellos, Dimitrios, 2014. "Incorporating life cycle external cost in optimization of the electricity generation mix," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 134-149.
    8. Roula Inglesi-Lotz & Anastassios Pouris, 2013. "On the causality and determinants of energy and electricity demand in South Africa: A review," Working Papers 201314, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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