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Economic analysis of the climate pledges of the Copenhagen Accord for the EU and other major countries

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  • Saveyn, Bert
  • Van Regemorter, Denise
  • Ciscar, Juan Carlos

Abstract

This article uses the world GEM-E3 computable general equilibrium model to assess the economic consequences of the climate ‘Copenhagen Accord’. The model allows analyzing the macroeconomic costs in terms of GDP, the change in employment, as well as the impacts on production of specific energy-intensive sectors. Various 2020 climate scenarios are evaluated depending on the GHG mitigation pledges. We find that the cost for the developed countries is around 0.5% of GDP in 2020 for the more ambitious pledges, whereas the GDP effects are more heterogeneous across developing countries and Russia, reflecting the different pledges and the assumptions in the reference scenario across these countries. Further, the article explores whether there is a form of double dividend in the EU when the revenues from auctioning or taxation of GHG emissions are used to reduce the social security contributions of employees. We conclude that GDP and employment perform better compared to the free allocation of permits when more sectors are subject to auctioning or GHG taxes and the additional government revenues are used to reduce the cost of labour.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 33 (2011)
Issue (Month): S1 ()
Pages: S34-S40

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:33:y:2011:i:s1:p:s34-s40

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

Related research

Keywords: Copenhagen accord; International climate policy; Green taxation; Competitiveness; Energy intensive industries; Auctioning;

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References

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  1. Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2000. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation: Pigou, Taxation, and Pollution," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0004, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  2. Mustafa H. Babiker & Gilbert E. Metcalf & John Reilly, 2002. "Tax Distortions and Global Climate Policy," NBER Working Papers 9136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Carraro, Carlo & Galeotti, Marzio & Gallo, Massimo, 1996. "Environmental taxation and unemployment: Some evidence on the 'double dividend hypothesis' in Europe," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1-2), pages 141-181, October.
  4. Böhringer, Christoph & Lange, Andreas, 2003. "On the Design of Optimal Grandfathering Schemes for Emission Allowances," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-08, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline & Mouez Fodha, 2005. "Double Dividend with Involuntary Unemployment: Efficiency and Intergenerational Equity," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00089913, HAL.
  6. Peter Russ & Juan Carlos Ciscar & Bert Saveyn & Antonio Soria & Laszlo Szabo & Tom Van Ierland & Denise Van Regemorter & Rosella Virdis, 2009. "Economic Assessment of Post-2012 Global Climate Policies - Analysis of Gas Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Scenarios with the POLES and GEM-E3 models," JRC-IPTS Working Papers JRC50307, Institute for Prospective and Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre.
  7. Parry, Ian, 2003. "Fiscal Interactions and the Case for Carbon Taxes over Grandfathered Carbon Permits," Discussion Papers dp-03-46, Resources For the Future.
  8. J. Delbeke & G. Klaassen & T. van Ierland & P. Zapfel, 2010. "The Role of Environmental Economics in Recent Policy Making at the European Commission," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(1), pages 24-43, Winter.
  9. Bert Saveyn & Stef Proost, 2008. "Energy-Tax Reform with Vertical Tax Externalities," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(1), pages 63-86, March.
  10. Babiker, Mustafa & Gurgel, Angelo & Paltsev, Sergey & Reilly, John, 2009. "Forward-looking versus recursive-dynamic modeling in climate policy analysis: A comparison," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1341-1354, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Orlov, Anton & Grethe, Harald & McDonald, Scott, 2013. "Carbon taxation in Russia: Prospects for a double dividend and improved energy efficiency," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 128-140.
  2. Duscha, Vicki & Schumacher, Katja & Schleich, Joachim & Buisson, Pierre, 2013. "Costs of meeting international climate targets without nuclear power," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S7/2013, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
  3. Salvador Barrios & Jonathan Pycroft & Bert Saveyn, 2013. "The marginal cost of public funds in the EU: the case of labour versus green taxes," Taxation Papers 35, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.

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