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Does truth win when teams reason strategically?

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  • Brosig-Koch, Jeannette
  • Heinrich, Timo
  • Helbach, Christoph
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    Abstract

    We study behavior in the race game with the aim of assessing whether teams can create synergies. The race game has the advantage that the optimal strategy depends neither on beliefs about other players nor on distributional or efficiency concerns. Our results reveal that teams not only outperform individuals but that they can also beat the “truth-wins” benchmark. In particular, varying the length of the race game we find that the team advantage increases with the complexity of the game.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 123 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 86-89

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:123:y:2014:i:1:p:86-89

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

    Related research

    Keywords: Race game; Strategic reasoning; Team decision making;

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