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Economic literacy, inequality, and financial development

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  • Lo Prete, Anna

Abstract

Empirical studies of the link between finance and inequality document that across countries financial development is associated with lower and decreasing income inequality. This article uses an indicator of economic literacy as a proxy for the ability to reap the benefits of financial investment opportunities, and documents that such specific competences matter for the relationship between changes in inequality and financial development. As financial markets become more sophisticated, the ability to take advantage of new investment opportunities may help reduce inequality, and the empirical association between financial development and lower income inequality indeed appears to be driven by economic literacy.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 118 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 74-76

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:1:p:74-76

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

Related research

Keywords: Inequality; Financial market participation; Economic competences;

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References

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  1. Tullio Jappelli, 2009. "Economic Literacy: An International Comparison," CSEF Working Papers 238, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  2. Maarten vanRooij & Annamaria Lusardi & Rob Alessie, 2007. "Financial Literacy and Stock Market Participation," Working Papers wp162, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  3. George R. G. Clarke & Lixin Colin Xu & Heng-fu Zou, 2011. "Finance and Income Inequality: What Do the Data Tell Us?," CEMA Working Papers 489, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  4. Beck, T.H.L. & Demirgüç-Kunt, A. & Levine, R., 2007. "Finance, inequality and the poor," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-3125426, Tilburg University.
  5. Claessens, Stijn & Perotti, Enrico, 2007. "Finance and inequality: Channels and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 748-773, December.
  6. Asli Demirguc-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2009. "Finance and Inequality: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 15275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-23, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Jessica Schicks, 2012. "Over-Indebtedness in Microfinance – An Empirical Analysis of Related Factors on the Borrower Level," Working Papers CEB 12-017, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. repec:rej:journl:v:16:y:2013:i:49:p:3-26 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Caliendo, Frank N. & Findley, T. Scott, 2013. "Time inconsistency and retirement planning," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 30-34.

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