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The effect of effort grading on learning

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  • Swinton, Omari H.

Abstract

In the fall of 2004, Benedict College - a Historically Black College in Columbia, SC - began enforcing a new grading policy called Success Equals Effort (SE2). Under this policy, students taking freshman and sophomore level courses were assigned grades that explicitly rewarded not only content learning ("knowledge" grade) but also measures of effort ("effort" grade). This paper examines the effects of effort grading using two stage least squares and fixed effect estimates. I find evidence of a strong positive correlation between "effort" grades and "knowledge" grades. Under some restrictions this relationship can be interpreted as "effort" producing "knowledge".

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 1176-1182

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:6:p:1176-1182

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

Related research

Keywords: Student effort Assessment Student performance Grading standards;

References

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  1. Omari Swinton, 2007. "Grading For Effort: The Success Equals Effort Policy At Benedict College," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 149-164, June.
  2. Betts, Julian R. & Grogger, Jeff, 2003. "The impact of grading standards on student achievement, educational attainment, and entry-level earnings," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 343-352, August.
  3. Dobkin, Carlos & Gil, Ricard & Marion, Justin, 2010. "Skipping class in college and exam performance: Evidence from a regression discontinuity classroom experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 566-575, August.
  4. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
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Cited by:
  1. Cid, Alejandro & Cabrera, José María, 2012. "Joint Liability vs. Individual Incentives in the Classroom. Lessons from a Field Experiment with Undergraduate Students," MPRA Paper 39907, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Darren Grant & William Green, 2013. "Grades as incentives," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 1563-1592, June.

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