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Intergenerational conflict and public education expenditure when there is co-residence between the elderly and young

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  • Arvate, Paulo Roberto
  • Zoghbi, Ana Carolina Pereira

Abstract

The main objective of this paper is to show that a family arrangement in which the elderly co-reside with the young determines that the elderly support the public education expenditure. Considering that this type of family arrangement is more common in Latin American countries than in the United States, our study is concentrated in Brazil. This study is based on a panel of 2054 Brazilian municipalities using data from the 1991 and 2000 censuses.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 29 (2010)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 1165-1175

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:6:p:1165-1175

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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Keywords: Education expenditures Population aging Co-residence Intergenerational conflict;

References

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  1. Poterba, James M, 1998. "Demographic Change, Intergenerational Linkages, and Public Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 315-20, May.
  2. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Rubinfeld, Daniel L & Shapiro, Perry, 1982. "Micro-Based Estimates of Demand Functions for Local School Expenditures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(5), pages 1183-1205, September.
  3. Ed Baldson & Eric Brunner, 2003. "Intergenerational Conflict and the Political Economy of School Spending," Working papers 2003-24, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  4. James M. Poterba, 1997. "Demographic structure and the political economy of public education," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 48-66.
  5. Rumberger, Russell W., 2010. "Education and the reproduction of economic inequality in the United States: An empirical investigation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 246-254, April.
  6. Ana Amélia Camarano & Maria Tereza Pasinato, 2007. "Envelhecimento, Pobreza e Proteção Social na América Latina," Discussion Papers 1292, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
  7. John Logan & Glenna Spitze, 1995. "Self-interest and altruism in intergenerational relations," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 353-364, August.
  8. Harris, Amy Rehder & Evans, William N. & Schwab, Robert M., 2001. "Education spending in an aging America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 449-472, September.
  9. Ladd, Helen F. & Murray, Sheila E., 2001. "Intergenerational conflict reconsidered: county demographic structure and the demand for public education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 343-357, August.
  10. Daouli, Joan & Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2010. "Mothers, fathers and daughters: Intergenerational transmission of education in Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 83-93, February.
  11. Sen, Anindya & Clemente, Anthony, 2010. "Intergenerational correlations in educational attainment: Birth order and family size effects using Canadian data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 147-155, February.
  12. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416.
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Cited by:
  1. Tim Krieger & Jens Ruhose, 2011. "“Honey, I shrunk the kids’ benefits!” — Revisiting intergenerational conflict in OECD countries," Working Papers CIE 46, University of Paderborn, CIE Center for International Economics.
  2. repec:pdn:wpaper:46 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Arvate, Paulo Roberto, 2013. "Electoral Competition and Local Government Responsiveness in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 67-83.

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