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Does aging affect preferences for welfare spending? A study of peoples' spending preferences in 22 countries, 1985–2006

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  • Sørensen, Rune J.
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    Abstract

    A recurrent assertion is that aging will intensify age-related conflict over public budget allocation. If people are led by their self-interest, the young will prioritize public education services, while the elderly will demand better pensions and health-care services. Addressing this issue requires longitudinal survey data and estimation of age (life-cycle), period and cohort effects. Except for a few of studies based on US data, such analyses are non-existent.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 259-271

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:29:y:2013:i:c:p:259-271

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

    Related research

    Keywords: Public spending attitudes; Life-cycle effect; Age structure;

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