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Estimating the impacts of rising food prices on nutrient intake in urban China

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  • Zheng, Zhihao
  • Henneberry, Shida Rastegari

Abstract

The nutritional impacts of rising food prices on urban households across income classes are assessed using the 2004 NBS urban household survey data for Jiangsu province of China. Empirical results from this study suggest that the across-the-board food price increase is expected to have a substantial adverse impact on nutritional well-being of urban households and in particular, the poor. Moreover, an increase in the price of food grains alone will have the largest adverse impact on calorie and protein intakes, whereas an increase in price of oils and fats only will induce the largest reduction in fat intake.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 23 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 1090-1103

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:23:y:2012:i:4:p:1090-1103

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

Related research

Keywords: China; Food prices; Nutrient intake; Urban households;

References

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  1. Guo, Xuguang, et al, 2000. "Structural Change in the Impact of Income on Food Consumption in China, 1989-1993," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(4), pages 737-60, July.
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  8. Zheng, Zhihao & Henneberry, Shida Rastegari, 2010. "The Impact of Changes in Income Distribution on Current and Future Food Demand in Urban China," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(1), April.
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  13. Zheng, Zhihao & Henneberry, Shida Rastegari, 2010. "An Analysis of Food Grain Consumption in Urban Jiangsu Province of China," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 42(02), May.
  14. Steven T. Yen & Biing-Hwan Lin & David M. Smallwood, 2003. "Quasi- and Simulated-Likelihood Approaches to Censored Demand Systems: Food Consumption by Food Stamp Recipients in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 458-478.
  15. Steven Yen & Kamhon Kan & Shew-Jiuan Su, 2002. "Household demand for fats and oils: two-step estimation of a censored demand system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(14), pages 1799-1806.
  16. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  17. Timmer, C. Peter, 1980. "Food prices and food policy analysis in LDCs," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 188-199, August.
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