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Introduction to the special issue on the role of nonfarm income in poverty reduction: evidence from Asia and East Africa

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  • Keijiro Otsuka
  • Takashi Yamano

Abstract

In this special issue, we present seven studies that collectively attempt to investigate the role of non-farm income in long-term and short-term poverty reduction in Asia and Africa. The first four studies out of the seven use long-term panel data over two decades in the Philippines, Thailand, Bangladesh, and India. These studies show drastic increases in non-farm income shares and corresponding declines in poverty levels over time, especially in the Philippines and Thailand. Education levels of household members and returns to education also increased significantly in these countries. The remaining three studies use cross-sectional and short-term panel data from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda. These African studies show high proportions of poor households and low shares of non-farm income that are somewhat comparable to the situation in the 1980s described in the Asian studies. Without the Green Revolution that provided stable farm income and potential financial resources to invest in children' education in Asia, it is not clear if African farm households can follow the Asian examples. Copyright 2006 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 35 (2006)
Issue (Month): s3 (November)
Pages: 393-397

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:35:y:2006:i:s3:p:393-397

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Cited by:
  1. Takahashi, Kazushi & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2007. "Human Capital Investment and Poverty Reduction over Generations: A Case from the Rural Philippines, 1979-2003," IDE Discussion Papers 96, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  2. Dewina, Reno & Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2010. "Human Capital, Mobility, and Income Dynamics: Evidence from Indonesia," Working Papers 11, JICA Research Institute.
  3. Anderson, Kym & Cockburn, John & Martin, William J., 2010. "Would Freeing Up World Trade Reduce Poverty and Inequality? The Vexed Role of Agricultural Distortions," 2010 Conference (54th), February 10-12, 2010, Adelaide, Australia 58880, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  4. Kym Anderson & Johanna Croser & Damiano Sandri & Ernesto Valenzuela, 2010. "Agricultural Distortion Patterns Since the 1950s: What Needs Explaining?," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2010-13, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  5. Mathenge, Mary K. & Smale, Melinda & Opiyo, Joseph, 2013. "Off-farm Work and Fertilizer Intensification among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya: A Cross-Crop Comparison," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150638, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  6. Lucas Gutierrez Rodriguez & Manuel Ruiz Perez & Xiaosheng Yang & Geriletu, 2011. "From Farm to Rural Hostel: New Opportunities and Challenges Associated with Tourism Expansion in Daxi, a Village in Anji County, Zhejiang, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(1), pages 306-321, January.
  7. Yamano, Takashi & Kijima, Yoko, 2010. "The associations of soil fertility and market access with household income: Evidence from rural Uganda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 51-59, February.
  8. Briones, Roehlano & Felipe, Jesus, 2013. "Agriculture and Structural Transformation in Developing Asia: Review and Outlook," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 363, Asian Development Bank.

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