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Policy, technology, and management strategies for achieving sustainable agricultural intensification

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  • David R. Lee
  • Christopher B. Barrett
  • John G. McPeak

Abstract

Considerable agreement exists among researchers, development practitioners, and policymakers regarding the goals of sustainable agricultural intensification (SAI). They include: achieving agricultural productivity growth, household food security, and improved rural livelihoods and employment, while simultaneously mitigating environmental degradation. However, the multiplicity of these objectives, as well as the choice of approaches to achieving them and the site- and context-specificity of specific technological and institutional interventions, assures that the research and policy challenges to achieving SAI will remain considerable. This article summarizes the contributions of the articles in this Special Issue in four areas of the literature. First, labor market constraints, the labor intensity of specific agricultural technologies and practices, and labor's substitutability, or complementarity, with other inputs are shown to widely influence their viability and related input efficiencies. Second, the articles identify specific tradeoffs and synergistic relationships that arise in the attainment of these multiple goals stemming from technologies, management practices, and policies introduced under specific agroclimatic, market, and institutional conditions. Third, these papers contribute to the literature on agricultural technology adoption by furnishing additional empirical evidence on the determinants and effects of investment behavior and adoption of specific technologies and management practices. Finally, the articles in this Special Issue emphasize that there is no single policy nor technological, management, or institutional innovation that unambiguously promotes SAI. Preferred policies must be contextualized and sensitive to initial biophysical, market, and institutional conditions. Copyright 2006 International Association of Agricultural Economics.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (03)
Pages: 123-127

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:34:y:2006:i:2:p:123-127

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Cited by:
  1. Tsunehiro Otsuki, 2013. "Nonparametric measurement of the overall shift in the technology frontier: an application to multiple-output agricultural production data in the Brazilian Amazon," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 1455-1475, June.
  2. Wollni, Meike & Lee, David R. & Thies, Janice E., 2008. "Effects of participation in organic markets and farmer-based organizations on adoption of soil conservation practices among small-scale farmers in Honduras," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6423, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Wollni, Meike & Lee, David R. & Thies, Janice E., 2009. "Effects of Participation in Organic Markets and Farmer-based Organizations on the Adoption of Soil Conservation Practices among Small-scale Farmers in Honduras," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51669, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. Wirsenius, Stefan & Azar, Christian & Berndes, Göran, 2010. "How much land is needed for global food production under scenarios of dietary changes and livestock productivity increases in 2030?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 103(9), pages 621-638, November.
  5. Tsunehiro Otsuki, 2009. "Systematized and Path-independent Measurement of Biased Technical Change," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-11, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  6. Berkhout, E.D. & Schipper, R.A. & Van Keulen, H. & Coulibaly, O., 2011. "Heterogeneity in farmers' production decisions and its impact on soil nutrient use: Results and implications from northern Nigeria," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 63-74, January.

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