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Animal husbandry in Africa: Climate change impacts and adaptations

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  • Seo, S. Niggol
  • Mendelsohn, Robert

Abstract

This paper uses a cross-sectional approach to analyze the impacts of climate change on animal husbandry and the way farmers adapt. The study is based on surveys of almost 5000 livestock farmers across ten countries in Africa. A traditional Ricardian regression finds that the livestock net revenues of large farms in Africa are more sensitive to temperature than those of small farms. Cross-sectional analysis also reveals that large farms (but not small farms) have fewer animals per farm in warmer places. Farmers tend to select beef cattle and chickens in cool climates and goats and sheep in hot climates. Using the Ricardian results and examining climate scenarios for 2060 and beyond, the net revenues of small farms are predicted to increase as much as 120% (+USD6 billion) but those of large farms are predicted to fall by 20% (-USD12 billion). The impact estimates in any given period also depend on the rainfall predictions. The results suggest that large livestock farms in Africa are more sensitive to temperature than small ones, primarily because of their dependence on cattle.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 02 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:56968

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Related research

Keywords: Climate change; Livestock; Impact; Adaptation; Africa; Livestock Production/Industries; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Q12; Q25;

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Cited by:
  1. Di Falco, Salvatore & Bulte, Erwin, 2013. "The Impact of Kinship Networks on the Adoption of Risk-Mitigating Strategies in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 100-110.
  2. Mohamed Esham & Chris Garforth, 2013. "Agricultural adaptation to climate change: insights from a farming community in Sri Lanka," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 535-549, June.
  3. Seo, S. Niggol & Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Hassan, Rashid & Kurukulasuriya, Pradeep, 2008. "A ricardian analysis of the distribution of climate change impacts on agriculture across agro-ecological zones in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4599, The World Bank.
  4. Kim, Chung-Sil & Jung, Hye-Kyung & Lee, Sang-Ho & Park, Soo-Young & Takei, Atsuo, 2012. "An Analysis on Determinants of Farmers´ Adaptation to Climate Change in Korea," Journal of Rural Development/Nongchon-Gyeongje, Korea Rural Economic Institute, vol. 35(2), July.
  5. Seo, S. Niggol & McCarl, Bruce A. & Mendelsohn, Robert, 2010. "From beef cattle to sheep under global warming? An analysis of adaptation by livestock species choice in South America," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2486-2494, October.
  6. Charles Nhemachena & Rashid Hassan & Pradeep Kurukulasuriya, 2010. "Measuring The Economic Impact Of Climate Change On African Agricultural Production Systems," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 1(01), pages 33-55.
  7. Deressa, Temesgen Tadesse & Ringler, Claudia & Hassan, Rashid M., 2010. "Factors affecting the choices of coping strategies for climate extremes: The case of farmers in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1032, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Pham Khanh Nam, 2010. "Cooperative Behavior, Social Capital and Development: Evidence from the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam," EEPSEA Research Report rr2010125, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Dec 2010.
  9. Ajao, A.O. & Ogunniyi, L.T., 2011. "Farmers’ strategies for adapting to climate change in Ogbomoso agricultural zone of Oyo state," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 3(3), September.
  10. Seo, S. Niggol, 2010. "Is an integrated farm more resilient against climate change? A micro-econometric analysis of portfolio diversification in African agriculture," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 32-40, February.

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