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Is an integrated farm more resilient against climate change? A micro-econometric analysis of portfolio diversification in African agriculture

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  • Seo, S. Niggol

Abstract

This paper examines whether an integrated farm that owns both crops and livestock is more resilient under global warming than a specialized farm in crops. Using around 9000 farm surveys across Africa, we explore how farmers choose one of the farm types and how the net revenue of each type varies across the range of climate in Africa. The results indicate that an integrated farm increases in number while a specialized farm decreases across Africa under climate predictions for 2060. The relative profitability of each system against each other also changes. An integrated farm becomes relatively more profitable over specialized farms half a century from now. The impacts of climate change on integrated farms range from 9% loss to 27% gain depending on climate scenarios. Behavioral models can capture portfolio diversification benefits that agro-economic models cannot measure.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 32-40

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:1:p:32-40

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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Keywords: Climate change Africa Integrated farm Livestock Adaptation Micro-econometrics;

References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Seo, S. Niggol, 2011. "An analysis of public adaptation to climate change using agricultural water schemes in South America," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(4), pages 825-834, February.
  2. Seo, S. Niggol, 2011. "Is an integrated farm more resilient against climate change? A micro-econometric analysis of portfolio diversification in African agriculture: Reply," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 450-451, June.
  3. Seo, S. Niggol & McCarl, Bruce A. & Mendelsohn, Robert, 2010. "From beef cattle to sheep under global warming? An analysis of adaptation by livestock species choice in South America," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2486-2494, October.
  4. Lybbert, Travis J. & Sumner, Daniel A., 2012. "Agricultural technologies for climate change in developing countries: Policy options for innovation and technology diffusion," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 114-123.
  5. Browne, Natalie & Kingwell, Ross & Behrendt, Ralph & Eckard, Richard, 2013. "The relative profitability of dairy, sheep, beef and grain farm enterprises in southeast Australia under selected rainfall and price scenarios," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 35-44.
  6. Kim, Chung-Sil & Jung, Hye-Kyung & Lee, Sang-Ho & Park, Soo-Young & Takei, Atsuo, 2012. "An Analysis on Determinants of Farmers´ Adaptation to Climate Change in Korea," Journal of Rural Development/Nongchon-Gyeongje, Korea Rural Economic Institute, vol. 35(2), July.

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