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The Adoption and Management of Soil Conservation Practices in Haiti: The Case of Rock Walls

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  • Bayard, Budry
  • Jolly, Curtis M.
  • Shannon, Dennis A.
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    Abstract

    Farmers are usually reluctant to adopt measures to reduce the toll of soil erosion; and even when soil conservation structures are adopted, farmers fail to manage them. This study investigates factors that influence adoption and management of soil conservation structures in Fort-Jacques, Haiti. The results show that personal characteristics of farmers, institutional factors, such as local group membership, training in soil conservation, per capita income and size of farm influence soil conservation adoption in Forte-Jacques. Age, education, per capita household income, participation in local groups, the interaction of per capita household income and farmers’ age influence rock wall management.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/44111
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Greek Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics Review.

    Volume (Year): 07 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 (August)
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aergaa:44111

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    Web page: http://www.etagro.gr/
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    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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    1. Namatié Traoré & Réjean Landry & Nabil Amara, 1998. "On-Farm Adoption of Conservation Practices: The Role of Farm and Farmer Characteristics, Perceptions, and Health Hazards," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(1), pages 114-127.
    2. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 1999. "Analysis of the Determinants of Adoption of Organic Horticultural Techniques in the UK," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 47-63.
    3. Edward B. Barbier, 1990. "The Farm-Level Economics of Soil Conservation: The Uplands of Java," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(2), pages 199-211.
    4. Francis D. K. Anim, 1999. "A Note on the Adoption of Soil Conservation Measures in the Northern Province of South Africa," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 336-345.
    5. Norris, Patricia E. & Batie, Sandra S., 1987. "Virginia Farmers' Soil Conservation Decisions: An Application Of Tobit Analysis," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
    6. Foltz, Jeremy D, 2003. "The Economics of Water-Conserving Technology Adoption in Tunisia: An Empirical Estimation of Farmer Technology Choice," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 359-73, January.
    7. Brian W. Gould & William E. Saupe & Richard M. Klemme, 1989. "Conservation Tillage: The Role of Farm and Operator Characteristics and the Perception of Soil Erosion," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(2), pages 167-185.
    8. Allen M. Featherstone & Barry K. Goodwin, 1993. "Factors Influencing a Farmer's Decision to Invest in Long-Term Conservation Improvements," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 69(1), pages 67-81.
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    Cited by:
    1. Jolly, Curtis M. & Shannon, Dennis A. & Bannister, Michael & Flauretin, Gardy & Dale, John (Zach) & Binns, Alvin & Lindo, Pauline, 2007. "Income Efficiency Of Soil Conservation Techniques In Haiti," 2006 West Indies Agricultural Economics Conference, July 2006, San Juan, Puerto Rico 36970, Caribbean Agro-Economic Society.
    2. repec:ags:ijamad:151874 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rasouliazar, Soleiman & Fealy, Saeid, 2013. "Affective Factors in the Wheat Farmers’ Adoption of Farming Methods of Soil Management in West Azerbaijan Province, Iran," International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development (IJAMAD), Iranian Association of Agricultural Economics, vol. 3(2), June.

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