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Imbalance of World Heritage List: did the UNESCO strategy work?

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  • Lasse Steiner
  • Bruno S. Frey

Abstract

The official intention of the UNESCO World Heritage List is to protect the global heritage. However, the imbalance of the distribution of Sites according to countries and continents is striking. Consequently, the World Heritage Committee launched the Global Strategy for a Balanced, Representative and Credible World Heritage List in 1994. To date, there have not been any empirical analyses conducted to study the impact of this strategy. This paper shows that the imbalance did not decrease and perhaps increased over time, thus reflecting the inability of the Global Strategy to achieve a more balanced distribution of Sites.

Suggested Citation

  • Lasse Steiner & Bruno S. Frey, 2011. "Imbalance of World Heritage List: did the UNESCO strategy work?," ECON - Working Papers 014, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:014
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    File URL: http://www.econ.uzh.ch/static/wp/econwp014.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    UNESCO; international organizations; international political economy; global public goods; world heritage;

    JEL classification:

    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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