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Politics, globalization, and food crisis discourse


  • Esposo Guerrero, Bernard Joseph


The literature on food security has mainly been focused on causes, effects, and/or the nature of the crisis. However, there have been only a few attempts to understand how the discourse on the subject matter was shaped and is still being shaped at present. Food security is at the intersection of many disciplines, and the factors perpetuating the crisis are largely diverse - population, social inequalities, nutrition and health, power monopolies in the international stage, and giant market drivers, among others. The paper aims at shedding light as to how nations really become food insecure to begin with. The discussion traces the globalization of food security as a product of discursive processes. By putting together and analyzing the factors like world politics, the entry of globalization, shifting trade patterns and even culture - through the years - a better understanding of why the problem came to exist and what it is all about is provided.

Suggested Citation

  • Esposo Guerrero, Bernard Joseph, 2010. "Politics, globalization, and food crisis discourse," Economics Discussion Papers 2010-22, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwedp:201022

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Food security; food insecurity; neoliberal globalization; trade; agriculture; political economy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • P4 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems
    • N90 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - General, International, or Comparative

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