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Architectures of Control in Consumer Product Design


  • Daniel Lockton

    (Judge Institute of Management, Cambridge)


The idea of architectures of control is introduced through examples ranging from urban planning to digital rights management, and the intentions behind their use in consumer products are examined, with reference to case studies of printer cartridges and proposed ‘optimum lifetime products.’ The reactions of the technical community and consumers themselves are also explored, along with some wider implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Lockton, 2005. "Architectures of Control in Consumer Product Design," Others 0512009, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpot:0512009
    Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on WinXP; to print on A4/A3;

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:12:y:2008:i:03:n:s1363919608002059 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    design; architectures of control; product design; engineering; technology; digital rights management; DRM; control; poka-yoke; code;

    JEL classification:

    • P - Economic Systems
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Z - Other Special Topics

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