IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpio/0502007.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Advancing Economic Research on the Free and Open Source Software Mode of Production

Author

Listed:
  • Jean-Michel Dalle

    (Université Pierre et Marie Curie)

  • P. A. David

    (Stanford University)

  • Rishab A. Ghosh

    (University of Maastricht-MERIT)

  • W. E. Steinmueller

    (University of Sussex-SPRU)

Abstract

Early contributions to the academic literature on free/libre and open source software (F/LOSS) movements have been directed primarily at identifying the motivations that account for the sustained and often intensive involvement of many people in this non-contractual and unremunerated productive activity. This issue has been particularly prominent in economists’ contributions to the literature, and it reflects a view that widespread voluntary participation in the creation of economically valuable goods that is to be distributed without charge constitutes a significant behavioral anomaly. Undoubtedly, the motivations of F/LOSS developers deserve to be studied more intensively, but not because their behaviors are unique, or historically unprecedented. In this essay we argue that other aspects of the “open source” phenomenon are just as intriguing, if not more so, and possibly are also more consequential topics for economic analysis. We describe the re-focusing and re-direction of empirical and theoretical research in an integrated international project (based at Stanford University/SIEPR) that aims at better understanding a set of less widely discussed topics: the modes of organization, governance and performance of F/LOSS development -- viewed as a collective distributed mode of production.. We discuss of the significance of tackling those questions in order to assess the potentialities of the “open source way of working” as a paradigm for a broader class of knowledge and information- goods production, and conclude with proposals for the trajectory of future research along that line.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Michel Dalle & P. A. David & Rishab A. Ghosh & W. E. Steinmueller, 2005. "Advancing Economic Research on the Free and Open Source Software Mode of Production," Industrial Organization 0502007, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpio:0502007
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 24
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/io/papers/0502/0502007.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan T. Eckhardt, 2016. "Welcome contributor or no price competitor? The competitive interaction of free and priced technologies," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 742-762, April.
    2. David, Paul A. & Shapiro, Joseph S., 2008. "Community-based production of open-source software: What do we know about the developers who participate?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 364-398, December.
    3. Paul David & Matthijs den Besten & Ralph Schroeder, 2008. "Will e-Science Be Open Science?," Discussion Papers 08-010, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, revised Jan 2009.
    4. Jean-Michel Dalle & Paul A. David, 2007. "“It Takes All Kinds”: A Simulation Modeling Perspective on Motivation and Coordination in Libre Software Development Projects," Discussion Papers 07-024, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    5. Jean-Michel Dalle & Paul A. David, 2005. "Simulating Code Growth in Libre (Open-Source) Mode," Discussion Papers 04-002, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    6. Cristiano Antonelli, 2006. "The Business Governance of Localized Knowledge: An Information Economics Approach for the Economics of Knowledge," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 227-261.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L - Industrial Organization

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpio:0502007. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.