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Labor market policy in developing countries : a selective review of the literature and needs for the future

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  • Fields, Gary S.

Abstract

This paper presents a selective overview of the literature on modeling labor market policies in developing countries. It considers welfare economics, theoretical models, and empirical evidence to highlight the three general features needed in future research on labor market policy in developing countries. The author identifies desirable research components (welfare economics, theoretical modeling, and empirical modeling) and pitfalls in the literature (inappropriate use of productivity, reliance on wrong kinds of empirical studies, lack of cost-benefit analysis, attention to only a subset of the goods and bads, and fallacy of composition). The paper concludes with suggested topics and methods for future research. The author states that sound labor market policy requires sound labor market models. The paper makes a case for developing policy based on explicit evaluation criteria, specific theoretical models, and comprehensive empirical evidence.

Suggested Citation

  • Fields, Gary S., 2007. "Labor market policy in developing countries : a selective review of the literature and needs for the future," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4362, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4362
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda, 2014. "The Informal Sector Wage Gap: New Evidence Using Quantile Estimations on Panel Data," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(1), pages 117-153.
    2. Matías Busso & Maria Victoria Fazio & Santiago Levy Algazi, 2012. "(In)Formal and (Un)Productive: The Productivity Costs of Excessive Informality in Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4047, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Matías Busso & Maria Victoria Fazio & Santiago Levy Algazi, 2012. "(In)Formal and (Un)Productive: The Productivity Costs of Excessive Informality in Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4047, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Lehmann, Hartmut & Pignatti, Norberto, 2007. "Informal Employment Relationships and Labor Market Segmentation in Transition Economies: Evidence from Ukraine," IZA Discussion Papers 3269, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Marouani, Mohamed A. & Robalino, David A., 2008. "Assessing interactions among education, social insurance, and labor market policies in a general equilibrium framework: an application to Morocco," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4681, The World Bank.
    6. World Bank Group, 2014. "Balancing Flexibility and Worker Protection," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23024, The World Bank.
    7. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13132-016-0434-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda, 2010. "Is informality bad? Evidence from Brazil, Mexico and South Africa," Working Papers 201003, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    9. Hasan, Rana & Jandoc, Karl Robert L., 2009. "Quality of Jobs in the Philippines: Comparing Self-Employment with Wage Employment," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 148, Asian Development Bank.
    10. Mohamed A. Marouani & David A. Robalino, 2012. "Assessing interactions among education, social insurance and labour market policies in Morocco," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(24), pages 3149-3167, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Labor Policies; Markets and Market Access; Population Policies;

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