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Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: evidence from the BHPS, 1991-1997


  • Panos Sousounis

    () (Department of Economics, University of the West of England)

  • Robin Bladen-Hovell

    (Keele University)


In this paper we investigate the role of workers‘ training history in determining current training incidence. The analysis is conducted on an unbalanced sample comprising information on approximately 5000 employees from the first seven waves of the BHPS. Training participation is modelled as a dynamic random effects probit model where the effects of unobserved heterogeneity and initial conditions are accounted for in a fashion consistent with methods proposed by Chamberlain (1984) and Wooldridge (2002) respectively. The results suggest that prior training experience is a significant determinant of a worker‘s participation in a current training episode comparable with other formal educational qualifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Panos Sousounis & Robin Bladen-Hovell, 2009. "Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: evidence from the BHPS, 1991-1997," Working Papers 0918, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:0918

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hector Sala & José Silva, 2013. "Labor productivity and vocational training: evidence from Europe," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 31-41, August.

    More about this item


    Training; state dependence; dynamic probit;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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