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When do people become adults? The Uruguayan case

Author

Listed:
  • Frank Furstenberg
  • Natalia Melgar

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Máximo Rossi

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

We explore what are the key facts that Uruguayans consider relevant for being an adult. In particular, we assess the linkages between adulthood and skills, income, labor market participation and marital status, among others personal attributes. With the aim of identifying behavioral patterns, we estimate ordered probit models. Our dataset is the 2008 survey carried out by the International Social Survey Program in Uruguay.This article points out that gender, age and the educational level are critical factors for understanding opinions about adulthood. Moreover, we extend previous findings by showing that living some circumstances does not make people to consider that they are relevant experiences. For example, regarding parenthood, there are non-significant differences between those who have had a child and those who have not.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Furstenberg & Natalia Melgar & Máximo Rossi, 2011. "When do people become adults? The Uruguayan case," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 2611, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2611
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francesco C. Billari & Chris Wilson, 2001. "Convergence towards diversity? Cohort dynamics in the transition to adulthood in contemporary Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-039, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Larry Bumpass & Ronald Rindfuss & Richard Jamosik, 1978. "Age and marital status at first birth and the pace of subsequent fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(1), pages 75-86, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    adulthood; transition; life course; Uruguay;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • J19 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Other
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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