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Trade, Education and Skills: A Theoretical Survey


  • Rossana Patrón

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)


This paper reviews the literature that relates trade, education and skills formation,intending to provide a theoretical background to policy discussions in education matters. The paper is organised as follows. Section 1 summarises the literature on education and human capital in trade models. Section 2 focuses on education as an investment and the process of human capital accumulation. Section 3 deals with the returns to education. Section 4 analyses the economic literature on the education production function and on issues of effectiveness, efficiency and quality. Section 5 discusses the public provision of education. Section 6 presents some concluding remarks.

Suggested Citation

  • Rossana Patrón, 2006. "Trade, Education and Skills: A Theoretical Survey," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1006, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:1006

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    public education; economics of education; trade;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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