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Mainstream Macroeconomics in the Light of Popper
[La macroeconomía ortodoxa a la luz de Popper]

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Abstract

Macroeconomics has been dominated over the last four decades by the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH) which implies that economies are inherently stable. REH is a key element of the New Neoclassical Synthesis (NNS) macroeconomic model which has also played a dominant role in theory and policy analysis over the last two decades. We analyse REH in light of Popper´s evolutionary theory of knowledge and learning. We claim that the latter provides macroeconomics with an epistemological and ontological foundation that, unlike REH, takes full account of human fallibility and upon which economists can build a more useful macroeconomic theory.

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  • Iván H. Ayala & Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2014. "Mainstream Macroeconomics in the Light of Popper [La macroeconomía ortodoxa a la luz de Popper]," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 14-04, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucm:doctra:14-04
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    1. M. Woodford., 2010. "Convergence in Macroeconomics: Elements of the New Synthesis," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 10.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    knowledge; Learning; Rational expectations; Evolutionary; Popper.;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General

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