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Migration, Development and Children Left Behind

Author

Listed:
  • Rodolfo de la Garza
  • Rodolfo

    (Division of Policy and Practice,UNICEF File URL:http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Postscript_Formatted__Migration_Development_and_Children_Left_Behind.pdf)

Abstract

This report examines the relationship between migration and development from a multi-faceted perspective. It draws on original field research and an extensive review of scholarly and policy studies to examine how migration affects a society’s economic, social, political and cultural characteristics. This results in an analysis that encompasses the multi-layered impact of migration, i.e., its effect on the individual, the family and the sending community. Among the key arguments for adopting this approach is that conventional analyses that focus on economic factors such as remittances to the virtual exclusion of others greatly over-estimate the gains resulting from emigration and under-value the costs emigration imposes on the overall well-being of families left behind, and on sending communities in general.

Suggested Citation

  • Rodolfo de la Garza & Rodolfo, 2010. "Migration, Development and Children Left Behind," Working papers 1005, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  • Handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1005
    as

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Mosley, 2012. "The politics of what works for the poor in public expenditure and taxation: a review," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-011-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Park, Albert Sanghoon, 2017. "Does the Development Discourse Learn from History?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 52-64.
    3. Amoyaw, Jonathan Anim & Abada, Teresa, 2016. "Does helping them benefit me? Examining the emotional cost and benefit of immigrants' pecuniary remittance behaviour in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 182-192.

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