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Politiques de R&D, Taxe Carbone et Paradoxe Vert


  • Grimaud, André
  • Neubauer, Mauricio Bermudez
  • Rougé, Luc


We study an economy in which a final good is produced by two sectors. One uses a non-renewable and polluting resource, the other a renewable and clean resource. A specific type of research is associated to each sector. The public authorities levy a carbon tax and simultaneously subsidize both research sectors. We study the impact of such a policy scheme on the rate of resource extraction and emissions. The subsidy to research in the clean sector goes in the opposite direction of the effects of the carbon tax. If the tax creates a green paradox, the subsidy moderates it; if the tax slows down resource extraction, then the subsidy generates a green paradox

Suggested Citation

  • Grimaud, André & Neubauer, Mauricio Bermudez & Rougé, Luc, 2013. "Politiques de R&D, Taxe Carbone et Paradoxe Vert," TSE Working Papers 13-447, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:27735

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    carbon tax; directed technical change; green paradox; R&D policy;

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development

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