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Same work, lower grade? Student ethnicity and teachers' subjective assessments

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  • Ewijk, R. van

Abstract

Previous research shows ethnic minority students to receive different grades when taught by majority teachers. This may happen either because of bias in teachers' grading, or because objective student performance is indeed altered. Using an experiment, I examine whether teachers grade minority and majority students differently for the same work. I find no evidence for this. However, teachers report lower expectations and unfavorable attitudes that both likely affect their behavior towards minority students, potentially inducing them to perform below their ability level. Effects of having majority teachers on minority students' grades therefore seem more likely to be indirect than direct.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewijk, R. van, "undated". "Same work, lower grade? Student ethnicity and teachers' subjective assessments," Working Papers 21, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:21
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Raisa Akifyeva & Alisa Alieva, 2016. "The Influence of Ethnicity on Teacher Expectations and Teacher Perceptions of Student Warmth and Competence," HSE Working papers WP BRP 65/PSY/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Lehr Brandon, 2016. "Information and Inflation: An Analysis of Grading Behavior," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 755-783, April.
    3. De Paola, Maria & Brunello, Giorgio, 2016. "Education as a Tool for the Economic Integration of Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 9836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. David Kiss, 2013. "Are immigrants and girls graded worse? Results of a matching approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5), pages 447-463, December.
    5. Amine Ouazad, 2014. "Assessed by a Teacher Like Me: Race and Teacher Assessments," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, pages 334-372.
    6. Maresa Sprietsma, 2013. "Discrimination in grading: experimental evidence from primary school teachers," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 523-538, August.
    7. Bjorn Tyrefors Hinnerich & Erik Höglin & Magnus Johannesson, 2015. "Discrimination against students with foreign backgrounds: evidence from grading in Swedish public high schools," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 660-676, December.
    8. Falch, Torberg & Naper, Linn Renée, 2013. "Educational evaluation schemes and gender gaps in student achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 12-25.
    9. Jens Ruhose, 2013. "Bildungsleistungen von Migranten und deren Determinanten - Teil II: Primar-, Sekundar- und Tertiärbereich," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(10), pages 24-38, May.
    10. Foster, Gigi, 2012. "The impact of international students on measured learning and standards in Australian higher education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 587-600.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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