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Mission (im)possible? Mobilizing innovation – and policies supporting it – in the transition to sustainability

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  • Jan Fagerberg

    (Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo & UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

Research has shown that transitions easily may take several decades if not more to unfold. However, it has also been suggested that change may occur faster when advantages for end-users are sufficiently large and/or there are proactive policies in place. This paper aims at providing new insights on these matters through a discussion of three specific cases, all from Europe, in which change has been very quick indeed: Wind energy in Denmark, the German Energiewende and electrical cars in Norway. The focus is particularly on the actors that took part, how policy schemes supporting these developments were shaped and what their impacts were. It is concluded that by embracing the opportunities offered by the renewable energy revolution and actively involving users (and attracting new ones) it is possible for policy-makers to encourage (green) innovation, create new jobs and significantly speed up the transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Fagerberg, 2019. "Mission (im)possible? Mobilizing innovation – and policies supporting it – in the transition to sustainability," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20190923, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tik:inowpp:20190923
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    File URL: http://www.sv.uio.no/tik/InnoWP/tik_working_paper_20190923.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Dietmar Braun, 2008. "Lessons on the political coordination of knowledge and innovation policies," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(4), pages 289-298, May.
    3. Edler, Jakob & Georghiou, Luke, 2007. "Public procurement and innovation--Resurrecting the demand side," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 949-963, September.
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