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Increasing Organ Donation via Changes in the Default Choice or Allocation Rule

Author

Listed:
  • Danyang Li

    () (Experimental Economics Center and Department of Economics, Georgia State University)

  • Zackary Hawley

    () (Department of Economics, Texas Christian University)

  • Kurt Schnier

    () (Experimental Economics Center and Department of Economics, Georgia State University)

Abstract

This research utilizes a laboratory experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative public policies targeted at increasing the rate of deceased donor organ donation. The experiment includes treatments across different default choices and organ allocation rules inspired by the donor registration systems applied in different countries. Our results indicate that the opt-out with priority rule system generates the largest increase in organ donation relative to an opt-in only program. However, sizeable gains are achievable using either a priority rule or opt-out program separately, with the opt-out rule generating approximately 80% of the benefits achieved under a priority rule program.

Suggested Citation

  • Danyang Li & Zackary Hawley & Kurt Schnier, 2013. "Increasing Organ Donation via Changes in the Default Choice or Allocation Rule," Working Papers 201302, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcu:wpaper:201302
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    File URL: http://www.econ.tcu.edu/RePEc/tcu/wpaper/wp13-02.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Klaus Abbink & Heike Hennig-Schmidt, 2006. "Neutral versus loaded instructions in a bribery experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 9(2), pages 103-121, June.
    2. Brigitte C. Madrian & Dennis F. Shea, 2001. "The Power of Suggestion: Inertia in 401(k) Participation and Savings Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1149-1187.
    3. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
    4. Samuelson, William & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1988. "Status Quo Bias in Decision Making," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 7-59, March.
    5. Johnson, Eric J & Hershey, John & Meszaros, Jacqueline & Kunreuther, Howard, 1993. "Framing, Probability Distortions, and Insurance Decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 35-51, August.
    6. Judd B. Kessler & Alvin E. Roth, 2012. "Organ Allocation Policy and the Decision to Donate," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2018-2047, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Herr, Annika & Normann, Hans-Theo, 2016. "How much priority bonus should be given to registered organ donors? An experimental analysis," DICE Discussion Papers 239, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    2. Alekseev, Aleksandr & Charness, Gary & Gneezy, Uri, 2017. "Experimental methods: When and why contextual instructions are important," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 48-59.
    3. Schwettmann, Lars, 2015. "Decision solution, data manipulation and trust: The (un-)willingness to donate organs in Germany in critical times," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(7), pages 980-989.
    4. Li, Danyang, 2016. "Effect of persuasive messages on organ donation decisions: An experimental test," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 150-159.
    5. Herr, Annika & Normann, Hans-Theo, 2016. "Organ donation in the lab: Preferences and votes on the priority rule," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 139-149.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; Organ Donation; Laboratory Experiment; Government Policy; Public Health;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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