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Climate Trading - The Clean Development Mechanism and Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Sanja Lutzeyer

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch and North Carolina State University)

Abstract

Global warming is today, without a doubt, one of the biggest international issues. Whilst no country will go completely unscathed by future consequences of climate change, the impacts thereof – in terms of loss of life as well as the relative effects on economies – are expected to be felt most severely in developing countries, specifically Africa. Nevertheless, the development of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the global environmental treaty – the Kyoto Protocol – has brought with it the potential of socially and environmentally sustainable industrial and energy development in Africa. This paper examines the carbon trading system resulting from the Kyoto protocol, and investigates the implications of the associated Clean Development Mechanism for Africa. Although the carbon market is still in its formative stages, the benefits of this research are plentiful. Not only is such research critical for raising awareness, but also ensures that African countries get a foothold in this nascent market. It is found that while producing carbon credits, CDM projects also have the potential to bring numerous benefits – such as sustainable development, transfer of skills and technology, improved adaptive capabilities, as well as access to new markets – to African host countries. If changes are implemented as suggested, the CDM has the potential to bring billions of dollars to Africa – a feat invaluable to the social and environmental development of the continent.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanja Lutzeyer, 2008. "Climate Trading - The Clean Development Mechanism and Africa," Working Papers 12/2008, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers60
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2008/wp122008/wp-12-2008.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Clean Development Mechanism; CDM; Africa; Climate Change; Emissions Trading; Policy; Carbon Credits; Carbon Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q59 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Other

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