IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/sza/wpaper/wpapers158.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Future of South African Economic History

Author

Listed:
  • Johan Fourie

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Stefan Schirmer

    () (School of Economic and Business Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand)

Abstract

This note reviews the state and future of South African economic history. We argue that although new techniques, archival sources, international interest and a greater propensity to collaborate within and across disciplines have stimulated new research over the last decade, overcoming our divided methodological and ideological past remains first priority if South African economic history is to make a contribution to future development theory and policy, in South Africa and across the developing world.

Suggested Citation

  • Johan Fourie & Stefan Schirmer, 2012. "The Future of South African Economic History," Working Papers 06/2012, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers158
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2012/wp062012/wp-06-2012.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Bridging the methodological divide
      by Johan Fourie in Johan Fourie's Blog on 2012-05-11 17:47:35
    2. Bridging the methodological divide
      by Johan Fourie in Johan Fourie's Blog on 2012-05-11 17:47:35

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Johan Fourie & Jan Luiten Zanden, 2013. "GDP in the Dutch Cape Colony: The National Accounts of a Slave-Based Society," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(4), pages 467-490, December.
    2. Gareth Austin & Stephen Broadberry, 2014. "Introduction: The renaissance of African economic history," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 893-906, November.
    3. Jeanne Cilliers & Martine Mariotti, 2017. "The Shaping of a Settler Fertility Transition: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century South African Demographic History Reconsidered," CEH Discussion Papers 08, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    South Africa; economic history; historians; Apartheid; colonial history;

    JEL classification:

    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers158. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Melt van Schoor). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/desunza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.