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Business Cycles in the Equilibrium Model of Labor Search and Self-Insurance

Author

Listed:
  • Makoto Nakajima

    () (Department of Economics University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract

This paper studies the cyclical properties the standard Mortensen-Pissarides model of labor search and matching embedded in the real business cycles model with capital, risk-averse agents, and lack of private insurance against unemployment risk. The model enables a direct comparison between the business cycle implications of the model and the U.S. aggregate data. It is found that the model with Nash bargaining wage setting rule fails to replicate the volatility of unemployment and vacancies observed in data, as shown in Shimer(2005) using the model without capital

Suggested Citation

  • Makoto Nakajima, 2006. "Business Cycles in the Equilibrium Model of Labor Search and Self-Insurance," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 426, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecfa:426
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bils, Mark & Chang, Yongsung & Kim, Sun-Bin, 2012. "Comparative advantage and unemployment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 150-165.
    2. Leena Rudanko, 2011. "Aggregate and Idiosyncratic Risk in a Frictional Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2823-2843, October.
    3. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim & Mark Bils, 2007. "Comparative Advantage in Cyclical Unemployment," 2007 Meeting Papers 508, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Christian BAYER & Klaus WALDE, 2010. "Matching and Saving in Continuous Time: Theory," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2010013, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    5. Den Haan, Wouter J., 2010. "Assessing the accuracy of the aggregate law of motion in models with heterogeneous agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 79-99, January.
    6. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Ayşegül Şahin, 2010. "Labour-Market Matching with Precautionary Savings and Aggregate Fluctuations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1477-1507.
    7. Mark Bils & Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim, 2008. "Heterogeneity and Cyclical Unemployment," RCER Working Papers 543, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    8. Mark Bils & Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim, 2011. "Worker Heterogeneity and Endogenous Separations in a Matching Model of Unemployment Fluctuations," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 128-154, January.
    9. Yongsung Chang & Sun-Bin Kim & Frank Schorfheide, 2010. "Labor-Market Heterogeneity, Aggregation, and the Lucas Critique," RCER Working Papers 556, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business Cycles; Labor markets Search Matching;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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