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Institutions and the Location Decisions of Highly Skilled Migrants to Europe

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  • Nowotny, Klaus

    () (University of Salzburg)

Abstract

The economic literature provides ample evidence that immigration of highly skilled workers is beneficial for the host economy. Yet, when compared to countries such as the USA or Canada, Europe receives a lower share of migrants with tertiary education, raising concerns that the EU does not attract enough highly skilled migrants. There is, however, considerable heterogeneity in the share of highly-skilled migrants across EU-15 countries which is even more pronounced at the regional level. This paper uses this heterogeneity to investigate the economic, labor market and institutional factors that make regions and countries attractive for highly skilled migrants vis-a-vis low-skill migrants. Controlling for a variety of regional characteristics, the regressions show both similarities and differences in the determinants of location choice between high- and low-skilled migrants and possible directions for migration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Nowotny, Klaus, 2013. "Institutions and the Location Decisions of Highly Skilled Migrants to Europe," Working Papers in Economics 2013-3, University of Salzburg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:sbgwpe:2013_003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Peter Huber & Anna Raggl, 2015. "Reaping the Benefits of Migration in an Ageing Europe," WWWforEurope Policy Brief series 7, WWWforEurope.
    2. repec:wfo:wstudy:58161 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:wfo:wstudy:60625 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    highly-skilled migration; regional location decisions; institutions; migration policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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