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The renewable energy targets of the Maghreb countries: Impact on electricity supply and conventional power markets


  • Brand, Bernhard

    () (Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln)

  • Zingerle, Jonas

    () (Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln)


Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, the three countries of the North African Maghreb region, are showing increased efforts to integrate renewable electricity into their power markets. Like many other countries, they have pronounced renewable energy targets, defining future shares of “green” electricity in their national generation mixes. The individual national targets are relatively varied, reflecting the different availability of renewable resources in each country, but also the different political ambitions for renewable electricity in the Maghreb states. Open questions remain regarding the targets’ economic impact on the power markets. Our article addresses this issue by applying a linear electricity market optimization model to the North African countries. Assuming a competitive, regional electricity market in the Maghreb, the model minimizes dispatch and investment costs and simulates the impact of the renewable energy targets on the conventional generation system until 2025. Special emphasis is put on investment decisions and overall system costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Brand, Bernhard & Zingerle, Jonas, 2010. "The renewable energy targets of the Maghreb countries: Impact on electricity supply and conventional power markets," EWI Working Papers 2010-2, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:ewikln:2010_002

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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Dong Wook & Chang, Hyun Joon, 2012. "Experience curve analysis on South Korean nuclear technology and comparative analysis with South Korean renewable technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 361-373.
    2. Choi, Dong Gu & Thomas, Valerie M., 2012. "An electricity generation planning model incorporating demand response," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 429-441.
    3. Brand, Bernhard & Boudghene Stambouli, Amine & Zejli, Driss, 2012. "The value of dispatchability of CSP plants in the electricity systems of Morocco and Algeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 321-331.
    4. Breitschopf, Barbara, 2015. "Policy mix and the impact on PV technologies and industry: The challenge - how to make policies quantifiable?," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S6/2015, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    5. Brand, Bernhard, 2013. "Transmission topologies for the integration of renewable power into the electricity systems of North Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 155-166.

    More about this item


    North Africa; Renewable energy sources; Electricity markets;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources

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