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Partial mean and inequality effects on catastrophic health payments: methods with application to Malawi

Listed author(s):
  • Mussa, Richard

This paper develops distribution-sensitive partial mean effects of determinants of out-of-pocket (OOP) catastrophic health payments. It also proposes methods that can be used to measure how changes in the distribution of the correlates of catastrophic health payments affect the incidence of catastrophic health payments; an inequality effect. The proposed methods are then applied to Malawian data from the Third Integrated Household Survey. The empirical application shows that a failure to account for these inequalities in the correlates, at least normatively, leads to a mismeasurement of the magnitudes of their partial effects. The results also indicate that the signs of the combined effects of a ceteris paribus unit increase in the mean and inequality effects are mixed; for some variables the inequality effect dominates the mean effect while for other variables a reverse pattern is observed.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/65203/1/MPRA_paper_65203.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 65203.

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Date of creation: 22 Jun 2015
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65203
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  1. Rama Pal, 2012. "Measuring incidence of catastrophic out-of-pocket health expenditure: with application to India," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 63-85, March.
  2. Eddy van Doorslaer & Xander Koolman, 2004. "Explaining the differences in income-related health inequalities across European countries," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 609-628.
  3. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896, April.
  4. Robert Sparrow & Ellen Van Poel & Gracia Hadiwidjaja & Athia Yumna & Nila Warda & Asep Suryahadi, 2014. "Coping With The Economic Consequences Of Ill Health In Indonesia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(6), pages 719-728, 06.
  5. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2003. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 207-223, January.
  6. Adam Wagstaff & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2003. "Catastrophe and impoverishment in paying for health care: with applications to Vietnam 1993-1998," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(11), pages 921-933.
  7. World Bank, 2013. "Malawi Public Expenditure Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 20586, The World Bank.
  8. Menno Pradhan & Nicholas Prescott, 2002. "Social risk management options for medical care in Indonesia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 431-446.
  9. Alexander J. Cowell, 2006. "The relationship between education and health behavior: some empirical evidence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 125-146.
  10. Michael Grossman, 1999. "The Human Capital Model of the Demand for Health," NBER Working Papers 7078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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