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Comparative analysis of working conditions in the European Union Member States


  • Wach, Krzysztof


This paper presents the main findings of the author’s study of statistics as well as Eu-ropean surveys on working conditions. Such solutions enabled to compare the data and make the results more reliable. The collected data concerns all Member States of the European Un-ion, where it was impossible to collect data for newest Member States (Bulgaria and Roma-nia), they were omitted. Where it was possible, the author compared the situation in Member States to the situation in the USA. The paper aims to provide an overview of the state of working conditions in the European Union, as well as indicating the nature and content of changes affecting the workforce and the quality of work. The main aim of the paper is to compare basic working conditions within all Member States of the European Union in order to point out leaders and sluggers in this field. This paper is limited to a straightforward presenta-tion of the results.

Suggested Citation

  • Wach, Krzysztof, 2007. "Comparative analysis of working conditions in the European Union Member States," MPRA Paper 31506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31506

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    regional labour markets; European integration; working conditions;

    JEL classification:

    • M59 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Other
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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