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Mortality, Fertility and Child Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Shankha Chakraborty

    () (University of Oregon Economics Department)

  • Mausumi Das

    () (Delhi School of Economics Economics Department)

Abstract

We discuss how child labor problems may persist in developing countries when adult mortality risks are endogenous. Children provide current consumption through child labor and future consumption via an informal social security arrangement. Poorer parents, unable to invest much in their health, face greater mortality risks and are inclined to send their children to work instead of investing in their human capital. Endogenous fertility decisions exacerbate the problem as parents substitute toward quantity investment in children.

Suggested Citation

  • Shankha Chakraborty & Mausumi Das, 2003. "Mortality, Fertility and Child Labor," University of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers 2003-35, University of Oregon Economics Department, revised 01 Dec 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:ore:uoecwp:2003-35
    as

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    File URL: http://economics.uoregon.edu/papers/UO-2003-35_Chakraborty_Child_Labor.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Credit constraints and the phenomenon of child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 81-102, February.
    2. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
    3. Moshe Hazan & Binyamin Berdugo, 2002. "Child Labour, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 810-828, October.
    4. Samwick, Andrew A., 1998. "Discount rate heterogeneity and social security reform," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 117-146, October.
    5. Emerson, Patrick M & Souza, Andre Portela, 2003. "Is There a Child Labor Trap? Intergenerational Persistence of Child Labor in Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 375-398, January.
    6. Lawrance, Emily C, 1991. "Poverty and the Rate of Time Preference: Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 54-77, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kitaura, Koji & Ogawa, Hikaru & Yakita, Sayaka, 2011. "Multiple equilibria arising from donor’s aid policy in economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 819-827.
    2. Kitaura, Koji, 2009. "Child labor, education aid, and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 614-620, December.
    3. Wang, Ruixin, 2015. "Essays on development economics and public economics," Other publications TiSEM e1779514-5b71-4726-925b-2, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Jayanta Sarkar & Dipanwita Sarkar, 2016. "Why Does Child Labor Persist With Declining Poverty?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 139-158, January.
    5. Brezis, Elise S. & Ferreira, Rodolphe Dos Santos, 2016. "Endogenous Fertility With A Sibship Size Effect," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(08), pages 2046-2066, December.
    6. Jocelyn E. Finlay, 2006. "Endogenous Longevity and Economic Growth," PGDA Working Papers 0706, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    7. Haruyama, Tetsugen & Park, Hyun, 2017. "A simple dynastic economy with parental time investment in children’s patience," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 235-247.
    8. Hung-Ju Chen, 2010. "Life expectancy, fertility, and educational investment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 37-56, January.
    9. Elise S. Brezis & Rodolphe Dos Santos Ferreira, 2012. "Endogenous Fertility and Intergenerational Transfers: The Significance of the Sibship Size Effect," Working Papers 2012-14, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    10. Christopher GRIGORIOU & Grégoire ROTA-GRAZIOSI, 2005. "Why do Education Expenditures Fail to Reduce Child Labor? Looking for an Optimal Composition of the Social Expenditures," Working Papers 200517, CERDI.
    11. Bruhns, Ramona, 2006. "The Long-run Effects of HIV/AIDS in Kenya," MPRA Paper 952, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Veronica Amarante & Rodrigo Arim & Gioia de Melo & Andrea Vigorito, 2010. "Family Allowances and Child School Attendance: An ex-ante Evaluation of Alternative Schemes in Uruguay," Working Papers PMMA 2010-07, PEP-PMMA.
    13. Fioroni, Tamara, 2014. "Health and Child Labour," MPRA Paper 58789, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fairness: child labor; fertility; mortality; education;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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