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Risk, Variety and Volatility in the Early Auto and PC Industry

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  • Mariana Mazzucato

    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Open University)

Abstract

The paper studies the co-evolution of industrial turbulence and financial volatility in the early phase of the US automobile industry (1900-1930) and the early phase of the US PC industry (1970-2000). In both industries, stock prices were the most volatile and idiosyncratic (compared to the general market) during the periods in which entry/exit rates, market share instability, and technological change were the strongest. Given the similarities between the early stages in the two industries, the patterns that have characterized the late evolution of automobiles provide some insights on the possible future of the PC industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariana Mazzucato, 2003. "Risk, Variety and Volatility in the Early Auto and PC Industry," Open Discussion Papers in Economics 41, The Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:opn:wpaper:41
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    1. Mariana Mazzucato & Willi Semmler, 1999. "Market share instability and stock price volatility during the industry life-cycle: the US automobile industry," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 67-96.
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    Cited by:

    1. J. Krafft & J. -L. Ravix, 2008. "Corporate Governance And The Governance Of Knowledge: Rethinking The Relationship In Terms Of Corporate Coherence," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1-2), pages 79-95.
    2. Mariana Mazzucato & Massimiliano Tancioni, 2005. "Innovation and Idiosyncratic Risk," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 81, Society for Computational Economics.
    3. Mata, José & Woerter, Martin, 2013. "Risky innovation: The impact of internal and external R&D strategies upon the distribution of returns," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 495-501.
    4. Alessandro Caiani & Antoine Godin & Stefano Lucarelli, 2012. "Innovation and Finance: An SFC Analysis of Great Surges of Development," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_733, Levy Economics Institute.
    5. Jackie Krafft & Jacques-Laurent Ravix, 2005. "The governance of innovative firms: an evolutionary approach," Post-Print hal-00203620, HAL.
    6. Mariana Mazzucato, 2006. "Innovation and Stock Prices: a Review of some Recent Work," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 97(5), pages 159-179.
    7. Jorge Niosi & Suma Athreye & Ted Tschang, 2012. "The Global Computer Software Sector," Chapters,in: Economic Development as a Learning Process, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Alessandro Caiani & Antoine Godin & Stefano Lucarelli, 2014. "Innovation and finance: a stock flow consistent analysis of great surges of development," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 421-448, April.

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