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Implementing Sustainable Urban Travel Policies in Mexico


  • Víctor Islas Rivera

    (Instituto Mexicano del Transporte)

  • Salvador Hernández G.

    (Instituto Mexicano del Transporte)

  • José A. Arroyo Osorno

    (Instituto Mexicano del Transporte)

  • Martha Lelis Zaragoza

    (Instituto Mexicano del Transporte)

  • J. Ignacio Ruvalcaba

    (Instituto Mexicano del Transporte)


This report describes the main challenges to urban travel in Mexico. We focus on some of the basic causes of urban transport problems, and we analyze some urban travel policies that could be considered good practices towards sustainable urban development. Mexico City is the emblematic case.

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  • Víctor Islas Rivera & Salvador Hernández G. & José A. Arroyo Osorno & Martha Lelis Zaragoza & J. Ignacio Ruvalcaba, 2011. "Implementing Sustainable Urban Travel Policies in Mexico," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/14, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:itfaab:2011/14-en

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    Cited by:

    1. Guerra, Erick Strom, 2013. "The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investments in Mexico City," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt88t7k9p5, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Guerra, Erick, 2014. "Mexico City's suburban land use and transit connection: The effects of the Line B Metro expansion," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 105-114.
    3. Guerra, Erick Strom, 2013. "The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investment in Mexico City," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4hf3b46g, University of California Transportation Center.

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