IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/oec/envaaa/58-en.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Addressing Competitiveness and Carbon Leakage Impacts Arising from Multiple Carbon Markets: A Modelling Assessment

Author

Listed:
  • Elisa Lanzi

    (OECD)

  • Damian Mullaly

    (The Treasury)

  • Jean Château

    (OECD)

  • Rob Dellink

    (OECD)

Abstract

Competitiveness and carbon leakage issues have been some of the main concerns in the implementation and discussions of climate policies. These concerns are particularly important in the presence of multiple carbon markets since differences in climate change policy approaches may have impacts on the relative competitiveness of domestic sectors in countries with more stringent policies, and on the environmental effectiveness through carbon leakage. This paper examines the macroeconomic and sectoral competitiveness and carbon leakage impacts associated with a range of stylised mitigation policy scenarios. The scenarios reflect different depictions of carbon markets in terms of their level of linkages, their coverage (i.e. number of countries participating, types of gases and sectors) and the stringency of the carbon pricing policy across countries. The paper also investigates some policies to address competitiveness and carbon leakage issues. The analysis considers border carbon adjustments (BCAs) as well as direct and indirect (offset-based) linking of carbon markets. The results show that in presence of multiple carbon markets, competitiveness can decrease in countries that undertake climate policies, also leading to carbon leakage. The negative sectoral competitiveness and leakage effects can be reduced when more countries act, more emission sources are covered, and when the climate mitigation policy is harmonised across countries. The results also show that response policies, such as BCAs and linking of carbon markets, can address some, but not all, of the competitiveness and carbon leakage issues. While BCAs are more effective in addressing domestic competitiveness concerns than linking instruments, the latter are better in preserving the welfare of countries that are not undertaking a climate policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisa Lanzi & Damian Mullaly & Jean Château & Rob Dellink, 2013. "Addressing Competitiveness and Carbon Leakage Impacts Arising from Multiple Carbon Markets: A Modelling Assessment," OECD Environment Working Papers 58, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:envaaa:58-en
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5k40ggjj7z8v-en
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    border tax adjustment; climate change; competitiveness; computable general equilibrium model; mitigation;

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oec:envaaa:58-en. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/enoecfr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.