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Measuring Governance


  • Charles P. Oman


  • Christiane Arndt



The use of governance indicators, as applied to developing countries, has grown spectacularly in recent years. Following the maxim that you cannot manage what you cannot measure, international investors and official development aid agencies, together with academics and the media, have turned widely to using quantitative governance indicators for both analytical and decision-making purposes – with far-reaching consequences for developing countries…

Suggested Citation

  • Charles P. Oman & Christiane Arndt, 2010. "Measuring Governance," OECD Development Centre Policy Briefs 39, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:devaab:39-en

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kenneth Kasa, 1997. "Does Singapore invest too much?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue may15.
    2. Dong He & Wenlang Zhang & Jimmy Shek, 2007. "How Efficient Has Been China'S Investment? Empirical Evidence From National And Provincial Data," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(5), pages 597-617, December.
    3. Aaditya Mattoo & Arvind Subramanian, 2009. "Currency Undervaluation and Sovereign Wealth Funds: A New Role for the World Trade Organization," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(8), pages 1135-1164, August.
    4. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-848, December.
    5. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2006. "Challenges and Opportunities for Resource Rich Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 5688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Blog mentions

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    1. How to measure governance
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-12-14 21:14:00


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    Cited by:

    1. John Richards, 2013. "Diplomacy, Trade and Aid: Searching for "Synergies"," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 394, November.
    2. Gisselquist, Rachel M., 2013. "Evaluating Governance Indexes: Critical and Less Critical Questions," WIDER Working Paper Series 068, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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