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Participatory Governance: The Missing Link for Poverty Reduction

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  • Hartmut Schneider

Abstract

• Empowerment of the poor is one ingredient in effective poverty reduction. • A demand-driven participatory approach enhances effectiveness and efficiency. • Accountability is the central lever for participatory governance. • Capacity building is necessary for making participatory governance a reality.

Suggested Citation

  • Hartmut Schneider, 1999. "Participatory Governance: The Missing Link for Poverty Reduction," OECD Development Centre Policy Briefs 17, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:devaab:17-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888041015581
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihuț Ioana-Sorina, 2015. "The Economic Governance: Concept, Instruments Of Measurment And Evolutions Across European Union Member States," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 237-246, July.
    2. Minogue, Martin, 2008. "What connects regulatory governance to poverty?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 189-201, May.
    3. Sheely, Ryan, 2015. "Mobilization, Participatory Planning Institutions, and Elite Capture: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Rural Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 251-266.
    4. Barbara Pozzoni & Nalini Kumar, 2005. "A Review of the Literature on Participatory Approaches to Local Development for an Evaluation of the Effectiveness of World Bank Support for Community-Based and Driven Development Approaches," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20203.
    5. Speer, Johanna, 2012. "Participatory Governance Reform: A Good Strategy for Increasing Government Responsiveness and Improving Public Services?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2379-2398.
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2090-:d:118714 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Paul Shaffer, 2008. "New Thinking on Poverty: Implications for Globalisation and Poverty Reduction Strategies," Working Papers 65, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    8. Anwar Shah, 2005. "Public Expenditure Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7436.
    9. Alex Aylett, 2010. "Conflict, Collaboration and Climate Change: Participatory Democracy and Urban Environmental Struggles in Durban, South Africa," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 478-495, September.

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