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Case Studies of Costs and Benefits of Non-Tariff Measures: Cheese, Shrimp and Flowers

Author

Listed:
  • Frank van Tongeren

    (OECD)

  • Anne-Célia Disdier

    (Institut national de la recherche agronomique)

  • Joanna Ilicic-Komorowska

    (OECD)

  • Stéphane Marette

    (Institut national de la recherche agronomique)

  • Martin von Lampe

    (OECD)

Abstract

This report applies a cost-benefit analysis to quantify the economic effects of non-tariff measures in the agri-food sector. Three case studies are presented to demonstrate how such analysis can help identify least-cost solutions of Non-Tariff Measures (NTMs) designed to ensure that imported products meet domestic requirements. The present analysis examines benefits and costs for the different domestic and foreign stakeholders involved, thus taking a broader view that goes beyond evaluating the trade impact alone.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank van Tongeren & Anne-Célia Disdier & Joanna Ilicic-Komorowska & Stéphane Marette & Martin von Lampe, 2010. "Case Studies of Costs and Benefits of Non-Tariff Measures: Cheese, Shrimp and Flowers," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 28, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:agraaa:28-en
    as

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kmbt57jjhwl-en
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rau, Marie-Luise & Shutes, Karl, 2012. "Differences Of Import Requirements In Agri-Food Trade – An Explorative Analysis Of New Data," 52nd Annual Conference, Stuttgart, Germany, September 26-28, 2012 133050, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    2. Marette Stéphan, 2016. "Non-Tariff Measures When Alternative Regulatory Tools Can Be Chosen," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-17, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food safety; international trade; non-tariff measures; plant health; trade policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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