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The Role of Household Saving in the Economic Rise of China

Author

Listed:
  • Nelson Mark

    () (Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame)

  • Steven Lugauer

    () (Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame)

  • Clayton Sadler

    () (Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame)

Abstract

We estimate the age distribution's impact on carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2006 by exploiting demographic variation in a panel of 46 countries. To eliminate potential bias from endogeneity or omitted variables, we instrument for the age distribution with lagged birth rates, and the regressions control for total population, output, and country and year fixed effects. The increase in the share of the population aged 35 to 49 accounts for a large portion of the observed increase in carbon dioxide emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Nelson Mark & Steven Lugauer & Clayton Sadler, 2012. "The Role of Household Saving in the Economic Rise of China," Working Papers 004, University of Notre Dame, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:nod:wpaper:004
    as

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    File URL: http://www3.nd.edu/~tjohns20/RePEc/deendus/wpaper/004_emissions.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christopher D. Carroll, 1997. "Buffer-Stock Saving and the Life Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 1-55.
    2. Franco Modigliani & Shi Larry Cao, 2004. "The Chinese Saving Puzzle and the Life-Cycle Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 145-170.
    3. Charles Yuji Horioka & Junmin Wan, 2007. "The Determinants of Household Saving in China: A Dynamic Panel Analysis of Provincial Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(8), pages 2077-2096, December.
    4. Chadwick C. Curtis & Steven Lugauer & Nelson C. Mark, 2015. "Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, pages 58-94.
    5. Chadwick C. Curtis & Steven Lugauer & Nelson C. Mark, 2015. "Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, pages 58-94.
    6. Carlos D. Ramirez & Rong Rong, 2012. "China Bashing: Does Trade Drive the “Bad” News about China in the USA?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 350-363, May.
    7. Wei Dong, 2007. "Expenditure-Switching Effect and the Choice of Exchange Rate Regime," Staff Working Papers 07-54, Bank of Canada.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chan, Kenneth S. & Lai, Jennifer T. & Yan, Isabel K.M., 2014. "Consumption risk sharing and self-insurance across provinces in China: 1952–2008," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 66-85.
    2. Che-cheong Poon & Tai-Yuen Hon, 2015. "Household Savings in Hong Kong: A Statistical Analysis," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 353-368, September.
    3. George J. Borjas & Kirk B. Doran, 2015. "Prizes and Productivity: How Winning the Fields Medal Affects Scientific Output," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 728-758.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate Change; Environment; Carbon Dioxide Emissions;

    JEL classification:

    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

    NEP fields

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