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How Land Use Shapes the Evolution of Road Networks

Author

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  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

  • Bhanu Yerra

Abstract

The present research develops an agent-based model to treat the organization, growth, and contraction of network elements. The components model travel demand, revenue, cost, and investment. Revenue earned by links in excess of maintenance costs is invested on the link to until all revenue is consumed. After upgrading (or downgrading) each link in the network, the time period is incremented and the whole process is repeated until an equilibrium is reached or it is clear that it cannot be achieved. The model is tested with three alternative land use patterns: uniform, random, and bell-shaped, to test the effects of land use on resulting network patterns. It is found that similar, but not identical, equilibrium hierarchical networks result in all cases, with the bell-shaped network, with a CBD, having higher level roads concentrated in a belt around the CBD, while the other networks are less concentrated

Suggested Citation

  • David Levinson & Bhanu Yerra, 2006. "How Land Use Shapes the Evolution of Road Networks," Working Papers 000013, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:landuseevolution
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/179831
    File Function: First version, 2007
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-organization; network growth; network evolution; transportation planning; land use planning;

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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