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The Optimal Collection of Seigniorage: Theory and Evidence

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  • N. Gregory Mankiw

Abstract

This paper presents and tests a positive theory of monetary and fiscal policy. The government chooses the rates of taxation and inflation to minimize the present value of the social cost of raising revenue given exogenous expenditure and an intertemporal budget constraint. The theory implies that nominal interest rates and inflation are random walks. It also implies that nominal interest rates and inflation move together with tax rates. United States data from 1952 to 1985 provide some support for the theory.

Suggested Citation

  • N. Gregory Mankiw, 1987. "The Optimal Collection of Seigniorage: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2270, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2270
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    14. Tobin, James, 1986. " On the Welfare Macroeconomics of Government Financial Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 9-24.
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