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Interviewer Effects on Nonresponse


  • Annelies G. Blom
  • Edith D. de Leeuw
  • Joop J. Hox

    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))


In face-to-face surveys interviewers play a crucial role in making contact with and gaining cooperation from sample units. While some analyses investigate the influence of interviewers on nonresponse, they are typically restricted to single-country studies. However, interviewer training, contacting and cooperation strategies as well as survey climates may differ across countries. Combining call-record data from the European Social Survey (ESS) with data from a detailed interviewer questionnaire on attitudes and doorstep behavior we find systematic country differences in nonresponse processes, which can in part be explained by differences in interviewer characteristics, such as contacting strategies and avowed doorstep behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Annelies G. Blom & Edith D. de Leeuw & Joop J. Hox, 2010. "Interviewer Effects on Nonresponse," MEA discussion paper series 10202, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:10202

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Miller & David Amirault & Laurent Martin, 2017. "What’s Up with Unit Non-Response in the Bank of Canada’s Business Outlook Survey? The Effect of Staff Tenure," Discussion Papers 17-11, Bank of Canada.
    2. Lucinda Platt & Renee Luthra & Tom Frere-Smith, 2015. "Adapting chain referral methods to sample new migrants," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(24), pages 665-700, September.
    3. Randall, Sara & Coast, Ernestina & Compaore, Natacha & Antoine, Philippe, 2013. "The power of the interviewer: a qualitative perspective on African survey data collection," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 48277, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Sara Randall & Ernestina Coast & Natacha Compaore & Philippe Antoine, 2013. "The power of the interviewer," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(27), pages 763-792, April.

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    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods

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