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Educational expenditure in South Africa: Evidence from the National Income Dynamics Study

Author

Listed:
  • Branson, Nicola

    (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • Kekana, Dineo

    (Saldru, University of Cape Town)

  • Lam, David

    () (University of Michigan)

Abstract

Differential education expenditure by racial group was a pillar in the architecture of apartheid. School systems diverged by racial group, with large funding and curriculum differences (Fiske and Ladd, 2004). In 1994, spending on white learners was about 1.5 times the spending on urban African learners and more than four times the spending on rural African learners (Fiske and Ladd, 2004). Since 1994 much focus has been paid by government to redress these educational expenditure inequalities with policies such as the National Norms and Standards for School Funding (NNSSF) and the rollout of the no fee schools program disproportionately allocating state funds to low socioeconomic schools and the fee-exemption policy providing low income households and grant recipients access to free education. Little is however known about how these policies have affected household educational expenditure across the income distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Branson, Nicola & Kekana, Dineo & Lam, David, 2013. "Educational expenditure in South Africa: Evidence from the National Income Dynamics Study," SALDRU Working Papers 124, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:124
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    File URL: http://www.opensaldru.uct.ac.za/bitstream/handle/11090/688/2013_124_Saldruwp.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicola Branson & David Lam & Linda Zuze, 2012. "Education: Analysis of the NIDS Wave 1 and 2 Datasets," SALDRU Working Papers 81, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miquel Pellicer & Patrizio Piraino, 2015. "The effect of non-personnel resources on educational outcomes: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 144, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Waidler, Jennifer, 2016. "On the fungibility of public and private transfers: A mental accounting approach," MERIT Working Papers 060, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Nicola Branson & David Lam, 2017. "The impact of the no-fee school policy on enrolment and school performance: Evidence from NIDS Waves 1-3," SALDRU Working Papers 197, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    educational expenditure; South Africa; NIDS; National Income Dynamics Study;

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