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Violence and political outcomes in Ukraine – Evidence from Sloviansk and Kramatorsk

Author

Listed:
  • Tom Coupe

    () (Kyiv School of Economics)

  • Maksym Obrizan

    () (Kyiv School of Economics and University of Duisburg-Essen and CINCH)

Abstract

In this paper, we study the effects of violence on political outcomes using a survey of respondents in Sloviansk and Kramatorsk – two cities that were affected heavily by the conflict in Eastern Ukraine. We show that experiencing physical damage goes together with lower turnout, a higher probability of considering elections irrelevant and a lower probability of knowing one’s local representatives. We also find that property damage is associated with greater support for pro-Western parties, lower support for keeping Donbas in Ukraine and lower support for compromise as a way to stop the conflict. Our paper thus shows the importance of investigating the impact of different kinds of victimization, as different degrees of victimization can have different, sometimes even conflicting outcomes. Our paper also suggests that one of the more optimistic conclusions of previous studies, that victimization can increase political participation, does not necessarily carry over to Ukraine, which illustrates the importance of country and context-specific studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Coupe & Maksym Obrizan, 2015. "Violence and political outcomes in Ukraine – Evidence from Sloviansk and Kramatorsk," Discussion Papers 55, Kyiv School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kse:dpaper:55
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    File URL: http://repec.kse.org.ua/pdf/KSE_dp55.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Huber, Martin & Tyahlo, Svitlana, 2016. "How war affects political attitudes: evidence from eastern Ukraine," FSES Working Papers 472, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    2. Coupe, Tom & Obrizan, Maksym, 2016. "The impact of war on happiness: The case of Ukraine," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 228-242.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ukraine; violence; turnout; war;

    JEL classification:

    • P26 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Political Economy
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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