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Beyond Marshallian Agglomeration Economies: The Roles of the Local Trade Association in a Meiji Japan Weaving District (1868-1912)

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  • Tomoko Hashino

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University/ Department of History, George Washington University)

  • Takafumi Kurosawa

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that economic development based on industrial districts or clusters is common not only in the Western nations but also among many developing countries, as Marshall might have anticipated. Similarly, in the development process of modern Japan, many industrial districts developed in various industries. Interestingly, they were much more organized and institutionalized than Marshall described. This article demonstrates that local trade associations had an important role in enhancing Marshallian externalities by facilitating joint actions for the supply of public goods, such as the creation of glocal district brands h and provision of technological and market information. In this article, we consider the case of Kiryu, which was one of the oldest and best-known silk weaving districts in modern Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomoko Hashino & Takafumi Kurosawa, 2011. "Beyond Marshallian Agglomeration Economies: The Roles of the Local Trade Association in a Meiji Japan Weaving District (1868-1912)," Discussion Papers 1113, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1113
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/2011/1113.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Hashino, Tomoko & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Hand looms, power looms, and changing production organizations: the case of the Kiryu weaving district in the early 20th century Japan," Economic History Working Papers 41659, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    2. Tomoko Hashino & Keijiro Otsuka, 2015. "The Rise and Fall of Industrialization and Changing Labor Intensity: The Case of Export-Oriented Silk Weaving District in Modern Japan," Discussion Papers 1501, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    3. Tomoko Hashino & Keijiro Otsuka, 2011. "From Smithian Growth to Schumpeterian Development: An Inquiry into the Development of the Kiryu Weaving District in the Early 20th Century Japan," Discussion Papers 1121, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    4. Tomoko Hashino & Keijiro Otsuka, 2013. "Expansion and Transformation of the Export-Oriented Silk Weaving District: The Case of Fukui in Japan from 1890 to 1919," Discussion Papers 1303, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrial district; industrial cluster; weaving industry; local trade association; joint action; modern Japan;

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