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Explaining How Delayed Motherhood Affects Fertility Dynamics in Europe

Author

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  • Bratti, Massimiliano

    () (University of Milan)

  • Tatsiramos, Konstantinos

    () (University of Luxembourg, LISER)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of delayed motherhood on fertility dynamics for women living in several European countries, which differ in terms of their institutional environments. We show that the effect of delaying the first child on the transition to the second birth differs both among working and non-working women and across countries. For non-working women delayed motherhood leads to a postponement effect which is higher in countries where religion and social norms determine a relative larger stigma effect for giving birth late. For working women, delaying the first birth raises the likelihood of progressing to the second parity due to an income effect, which is larger in countries with high childcare provision and part-time employment opportunities. We show that the overall effect of delayed motherhood depends on these two opposite forces, which are determined by the institutional environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Bratti, Massimiliano & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos, 2008. "Explaining How Delayed Motherhood Affects Fertility Dynamics in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 3907, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3907
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre‐Carl Michaud & Konstantinos Tatsiramos, 2011. "Fertility and female employment dynamics in Europe: the effect of using alternative econometric modeling assumptions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 641-668, June.
    2. Pierre‐Carl Michaud & Konstantinos Tatsiramos, 2011. "Fertility and female employment dynamics in Europe: the effect of using alternative econometric modeling assumptions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 641-668, June.
    3. Laura Cavalli, 2012. "Fertility Intentions of Employed Mothers in Italy: Does the Choice of Public versus Private Sector Matter?," Working Papers 27/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    4. Joshua R. Goldstein & Tomáš Sobotka & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2009. "The end of 'lowest-low' fertility? (with supplementary materials)," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    age; childbirth; ECHP; postponement; fertility; duration;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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