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Female Suicide and the Concept of the Midlife Crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Oswald, Andrew J.

    () (University of Warwick)

  • Tohamy, Ahmed

    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

The idea that humans – especially females – are prone to some form of 'midlife crisis' has typically been viewed with extreme skepticism by social scientists. We point out the potential equivalence between an age U-shape in a new well-being literature and a matching hill-shape in especially female suicide risk (evident in 28 countries and visible in the United States even 30 years ago). This concordance between two currently separate kinds of evidence, including a result on non-human primates, is apparently not known to many researchers or public commentators. It may be necessary to reconsider traditional thinking on the midlife crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Oswald, Andrew J. & Tohamy, Ahmed, 2017. "Female Suicide and the Concept of the Midlife Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 10759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10759
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    happiness; aging; suicide; well-being; GHQ; mental-health; depression; life-course;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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